About David Kotz

David Kotz is the Champion International Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Dartmouth College. He currently serves as Interim Provost, after serving six years as Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Sciences and four years as the Executive Director of the Institute for Security Technology Studies. His research interests include security and privacy, pervasive computing for healthcare, and wireless networks. He has published over 130 refereed journal and conference papers and obtained over $65m in grant funding. He is an IEEE Fellow, a Senior Member of the ACM, a 2008 Fulbright Fellow to India, and an elected member of Phi Beta Kappa. After receiving his A.B. in Computer Science and Physics from Dartmouth in 1986, he completed his Ph.D in Computer Science from Duke University in 1991 and returned to Dartmouth to join the faculty. For more information see http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~dfk/. After receiving his A.B. in Computer Science and Physics from Dartmouth in 1986, he completed his Ph.D in Computer Science from Duke University in 1991 and returned to Dartmouth to join the faculty. For more information see http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~dfk/.

WearSys papers, MobiSys posters

THaW researchers are showing off some cool research at this week’s MobiSys conference in Niagara Falls, with three papers at MobiSys workshops and a poster in the poster session.

  • Aarathi Prasad and David Kotz. ENACT: Encounter-based Architecture for Contact Tracing. In ACM Workshop on Physical Analytics (WPA), pages 37-42, June 2017. ACM Press. DOI 10.1145/3092305.3092310.
  • Rui Liu, Reza Rawassizadeh, and David Kotz. Toward Accurate and Efficient Feature Selection for Speaker Recognition on Wearables. InProceedings of the ACM Workshop on Wearable Systems and Applications (WearSys), pages 41-46, 2017. ACM Press. DOI 10.1145/3089351.3089352.
  • Rui Liu, Cory Cornelius, Reza Rawassizadeh, Ron Peterson, and David Kotz. Poster: Vocal Resonance as a Passive Biometric. In Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services (MobiSys), pages 160, 2017. ACM Press. DOI 10.1145/3081333.3089304.
  • Xiaohui Liang and David Kotz. AuthoRing: Wearable User-presence Authentication. In Proceedings of the ACM Workshop on Wearable Systems and Applications (WearSys), pages 5-10, 2017. ACM Press. DOI 10.1145/3089351.3089357.

Wanda – Securely introducing mobile devices

A few months ago we announced the results of our Wanda project, as published in INFOCOM 2016.  Today we’re excited to share this new video description of the project! Thanks to Abby Starr and Shiyao Peng of Dartmouth’s DALI lab, and Tim Pierson of the THaW team, for this fun and informative production.

Nearly every setting is increasingly populated with wireless and mobile devices – whether appliances in a home, medical devices in a health clinic, sensors in an industrial setting, or devices in an office or school. There are three fundamental operations when bringing a new device into any of these settings: (1) to configure the device to join the wireless local-area network, (2) to partner the device with other nearby devices so they can work together, and (3) to configure the device so it connects to the relevant individual or organizational account in the cloud. The challenge is to accomplish all three goals simply, securely, and consistent with user intent. We call our approach Wanda – a `magic wand’ that accomplishes all three of the above goals – and evaluate a prototype implementation.

NSF website highlights THaW

NSF highlighted the THaW project on its website last week, gaining notice in blogs like Politico morning eHealth, the HealthITSecurity, and FierceMobileHealthcare.  NSF’s article describes THaW research on mobile-app security and on the authentication of clinical staff to clinical information systems, among other things.

Klara Nahrstedt honored

nahrstedt_thawACM SIGMOBILE’s group N2Women announced today its inaugural list of “10 women in networking/ communications that you should know”, including THaW co-PI Klara Nahrstedt from UIUC.  She is in impressive company – details on these ten amazing women, as well as quotes from the many people who nominated these women, are available at the link below.

http://sites.ieee.org/com-n2women/files/2015/12/Top10-20151.pdf

Congratulations to Professor Klara Nahrstedt!

THaW researchers help secure the Precision Medicine Initiative

Earlier this year, President Obama presented a plan to launch the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI), an ambitious research effort to recruit over one million participants in a long-term effort to understand the individual characteristics of health and disease. The research effort will aggregate clinical data as well as behavioral and environmental data – including, potentially, sensor data from smartphones and wearables – which will, needless to say, require careful security precautions and wise privacy policies.

The PMI advisory board invited THaW researcher David Kotz to a summer workshop on the potential for mobile technology in collecting data for PMI, and specifically to comment on mechanisms to support privacy.  The PMI’s proposed Privacy and Trust Principles are an interesting read! [pdf]

White HouseToday, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) gathered a dozen thought leaders – including THaW team members Darren Lacey and David Kotz – to advise them as they begin developing a security framework for the Precision Medicine Initiative.  This fascinating discussion was led by Chief Data Scientist DJ Patil, and is just the first step in developing a comprehensive security framework for this important national research initiative.

THaW webinar – September 8 at NSF

Security and Privacy: Mobile Medical Applications
David Kotz, PhD – Dartmouth College

September 8, 2015      12pm-1pm ET

NSF CISE: Smart and Connected Health Presentation and Webcast
4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington VA, Room 110

Mobile medical applications offer tremendous opportunities to improve quality and access to care, reduce cost, and improve individual wellness and public health. These new technologies, whether in the form of software for smartphones as specialized devices to be worn, carried, or applied as needed, may also pose risks if they are not designed or configured with security and privacy in mind. For example, a patient’s insulin pump may accept dosage instructions from unauthorized smartphones running a spoofed application; another patient’s fertility-tracking app may be probing the Bluetooth network for its associated device, exposing her use of this app to nearby strangers. In this webinar, Dr. David Kotz presents an overview of the security and privacy challenges posed by mobile medical applications, including important open issues that require further research.

 Webcast Access:  https://nsf.webex.com/nsf/onstage/g.php?d=744297685&t=a

THaW quoted on Anthem story

When KQED radio needed input on the breaking news about the Anthem hacking incident, they reached out to THaW.  David Kotz, PI, is quoted in this brief story on KQED: ; the tagline is “California’s largest private insurer, Anthem, said on Wednesday it has been hacked. The insurer said hackers broke into databases that stored customers’ personal information such as birthdays, social security numbers and employment information.”

 

THaW goes to India

image of historic vidhana-soudha building in BangaloreTHaW PI David Kotz presented a keynote talk at the Workshop on Networked Healthcare Technologies (NetHealth) today in Bangalore, India. This talk provided an overview of the economic and technical trends leading to the THaW project, a summary of a few THaW projects underway, and a research agenda for security and privacy in healthcare IT. The talk was well received and was a wonderful opportunity for interchange of ideas in both the US and India contexts.