Interview with Scott Breece – CISO, Community Health Systems

Scott Breece, VP and CISO of Community Health Systems, discusses the rising security threat in healthcare with M. Eric Johnson, Dean of Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management. Scott highlights how health IT is transforming healthcare, improving the patient experience and outcomes. However, digitization of healthcare data also creates new risks for the healthcare system. Scott discusses how Community Health Systems is staying ahead of those threats and securing patient data. This video was partially supported by the THaW project, which is co-led by Eric Johnson.

Best Poster – MobiCom’18

Tim Pierson’s dissertation work resulted in an innovative method for single-antenna Wi-Fi devices (like many mHealth devices, medical devices, or those in the IoT) to determine with strong confidence whether a Wi-Fi transmitter is close by (within a few centimeters).  This proximity detector can be the basis for trustworthy relationships between devices.   A poster paper about this idea just won the best-poster award at MobiCom 2018, and the full paper was just accepted for presentation at MobiCom 2019. See below for the abstract, or check out the corresponding three-page paper.poster award

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Ubicomp’18: securing clinical desktops with smart wristbands

Authentication has become an integral part of computer usage, but it still remains an interruptive step in people’s workflow. To authenticate to a computer, depending on the authentication method, users must exert mental effort (e.g., recall their password) and/or physical effort (e.g., type their password). These factors increase the cost of context switch for users – cost of switching attention from a primary task to the authentication step and back to the task – disrupting users’ workflow.  Clinical staff have often told us they are frustrated by the need to repeatedly log into their clinical desktop computers – sometimes hundreds of times in a day.

In this paper, presented by David Kotz at Ubicomp’18 in Singapore, we propose Seamless Authentication using Wristbands (SAW). SAW is an authentication method designed to address this shortcoming of proximity-based authentication methods, and we do so by adding a quick low-effort user input step that explicitly captures user intentionality for authentication. In SAW, the user’s wristband (e.g., fitness tracker, smartwatch) acts as the user’s authentication token.  Read more below, and in the paper.

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Morgan State joins THaW

KornegayTHaW welcomes Professor Kevin Kornegay and his students from Morgan State University in Baltimore MD.  Kevin’s lab brings deep expertise in Medical IoT device security assessment, profiling, and hardening to an exploration of voice-based assistants.

Voice-assisted IoT devices such as Alexa, Siri, and Google Assistant are gaining use as portals for medical services. However, the potential safety and security issues they pose are not well understood by patients and consumers. In this collaboration, we will investigate some of the potential security issues of these devices using reverse engineering techniques to expose the vulnerabilities and propose recommendations for secure usage.

Ubicomp’18: vocal resonance as a biometric

At the Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing conference, Ubicomp, David Kotz presented THaW’s work to develop a novel biometric approach to identifying and verifying who is wearing a device – an important consideration for a medical device that may be collecting diagnostic information that is fed into an electronic health record. Their novel approach is to use vocal resonance, i.e., the sound of your voice as it passes through bones and tissues, for a device to recognize its wearer and verify that it is physically in contact with the wearer… not just nearby.  They implemented the method on a wearable-class computing device and showed high accuracy and low energy consumption. 2018-10-08-00147-crop.jpg

Rui Liu, Cory Cornelius, Reza Rawassizadeh, Ron Peterson, and David Kotz. Vocal Resonance: Using Internal Body Voice for Wearable AuthenticationProceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies (IMWUT) (UbiComp), 2(1), March 2018. DOI 10.1145/3191751.

Abstract: We observe the advent of body-area networks of pervasive wearable devices, whether for health monitoring, personal assistance, entertainment, or home automation. For many devices, it is critical to identify the wearer, allowing sensor data to be properly labeled or personalized behavior to be properly achieved. In this paper we propose the use of vocal resonance, that is, the sound of the person’s voice as it travels through the person’s body – a method we anticipate would be suitable for devices worn on the head, neck, or chest. In this regard, we go well beyond the simple challenge of speaker recognition: we want to know who is wearing the device. We explore two machine-learning approaches that analyze voice samples from a small throat-mounted microphone and allow the device to determine whether (a) the speaker is indeed the expected person, and (b) the microphone-enabled device is physically on the speaker’s body. We collected data from 29 subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of a prototype, and show that our DNN method achieved balanced accuracy 0.914 for identification and 0.961 for verification by using an LSTM-based deep-learning model, while our efficient GMM method achieved balanced accuracy 0.875 for identification and 0.942 for verification.

THaW’s Eric Johnson Meets With Sherry Ryan

In June, THaW’s Eric Johnson once again met with a prominent Information Security Officer to discuss the state of security in health care. Juniper Networks’ CISO Sherry Ryan met with Eric to discuss the global implications of cloud-based computing, and attacks from hostile nation states. Click above to watch the discussion in full.

THaW’s Eric Johnson Meets With Talvis Love

As part of THaW’s efforts to discuss the state of security in the health care industry, Eric Johnson continues to meet with prominent Information Security Officers to discuss the current challenges in the industry. This time, Eric met with Cardinal Health’s Talvis Love to discuss a variety of topics, including the intricacies of a the migration to the cloud for data storage and retrieval. Click above to watch the discussion in full.

Best Paper Award at NDSS to Team featuring THaW Researchers

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A team featuring THaW PI Carl Gunter and led by his student Guliz Seray Tuncay recently won “Best Paper” at NDSS. Resolving the Predicament of Android Custom Permissions was so well received at the conference it took home highest honors. To check out the full text, and what the team discovered about conflicting trust levels in regard to Android permissions, click through on the link below.

PDF: Resolving the Predicament of Android Custom Permissions

Kevin Fu Researches Mystery Embassy Ailment

THaW researcher Kevin Fu, along with colleagues Chen Yan and Wenyuan Xu, recently released a technical report on a mysterious ailment at the United States embassy in Cuba. After exploring a wide variety of options, the trio concluded that the ailment may in fact have inadvertently been caused by interfering ultrasonic waves in the environment. Click through below to see some press coverage their discoveries have received, in addition to the full technical report.

The Conversation – Can Sound Be Used As A Weapon?

IEEE Spectrum – Finally, A Likely Explanation for the “Sonic Weapon” Used At The US Embassy In Cuba

PDF: On Cuba, Diplomats, Ultrasound, and Intermodulation Distortion

THaW Releases Technical Report On STEM Outreach Program

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As part of THaW’s efforts towards community outreach and education, we have developed a curriculum based on the FitBit technology platform. This curriculum has been successfully deployed in two pilot groups let by THaW associates over the past two years.

Now, THaW researcher Joseph Carrigan, along with PI’s David Kotz and Avi Rubin, has formalized the curriculum into a technical report to allow others to use our implementation. Said Carrigan, “We developed an outreach activity that is engaging, informative, and repeatable. We are interested to see how it will be used at other locations.” To peruse the technical report and access the curriculum guidelines, please click below.

STEM Outreach Activity with Fitbit Wearable Devices