IoT Two-Factor Neurometric Authentication

Angel Rodriguez, Sara Rampazzi, and Kevin Fu recently had a poster accepted titled IoT Two-Factor Neurometric Authentication System using Wearable EEG:

Abstract: The IoT authentication space suffers from various user-sided drawbacks, such as poor password choice, the accidental publication of biometric data, and the practice of disabling authentication completely. This is commonly attributed to the “Security vs Usability” problem – generally, the stronger the authentication, the more inconvenient it is to perform and maintain for the user. Neurometric authentication offers a compelling resistance to eavesdropping and replay attacks, and the ability for a user to simply “think to unlock”. Furthermore, the recent increase in popularity of consumer EEG devices, as well as new research demonstrating its accuracy, have made EEG-based neurometric authentication much more viable.

Using a Support Vector Machine and one-time tokens, we present a secure two-factor authentication method, that allows a user to authenticate multiple IoT devices. We perform preliminary trials on the Psyionet BCI dataset and demonstrate a qualitative comparison of extracted EEG feature sets.

RampazziLeft: IoT two factor authentication scheme –  (1)  After internal user-thought authentication, the  device securely sends a one-time token to the IoT device. (2) The IoT device securely communicates with a server to verify the token. (3) If the token is verified, the server sends a secure confirmation reply to the IoT device, authenticating the user. Right: Proof of concept using the Psyionet BCI dataset – The top row shows the averaged covariance matrices of the extracted features of two different users thinking about the same mental task (imagining closing their fists). The bottom row shows similar features for one user thinking of two different tasks (imagine closing both fists vs both feet).

Proceedings of the IEEE Workshop on the Internet of Safe Things (SafeThings), May 2019. Accepted, publication pending.

 

Testimony in support of IoT Security

Professor Avi Rubin recently testified at a Maryland State Senate Finance Committee, hearing regarding a bill about IoT security [February 26, 2019].  Below are his remarks.

My name is Avi Rubin, and I am a full professor of Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University and Technical Director of our Information Security Institute. I am also the Founder and Chief Scientist of Harbor Labs, a Maryland CyberSecurity company that has developed an IoT Security Analysis product. I have been an active researcher in the area of Computer and Network Security since 1992. The primary focus of my research is Security for the Internet of Things (IoT Security). These are the types of connected devices that are addressed in SB 553.

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Securing the life-cycle of Smart Environments (video)

This one-hour talk by David Kotz was presented at ARM Research in Austin, TX at the end of January 2019.  The first half covers some recent THaW research about Wanda and SNAP and the second half lays out some security challenges in the Internet of Things.  Watch the video below.

Abstract: The homes, offices, and vehicles of tomorrow will be embedded with numerous “Smart Things,” networked with each other and with the Internet. Many of these Things interact with their environment, with other devices, and with human users – and yet most of their communications occur invisibly via wireless networks.  How can users express their intent about which devices should communicate – especially in situations when those devices have never encountered each other before?   We present our work exploring novel combinations of physical proximity and user interaction to ensure user intent in establishing and securing device interactions. 

What happens when an occupant moves out or transfers ownership of her Smart Environment?  How does an occupant identify and decommission all the Things in an environment before she moves out?  How does a new occupant discover, identify, validate, and configure all the Things in the environment he adopts?  When a person moves from smart home to smart office to smart hotel, how is a new environment vetted for safety and security, how are personal settings migrated, and how are they securely deleted on departure?  When the original vendor of a Thing (or the service behind it) disappears, how can that Thing (and its data, and its configuration) be transferred to a new service provider?  What interface can enable lay people to manage these complex challenges, and be assured of their privacy, security, and safety?   We present a list of key research questions to address these important challenges.